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BIO

Sean Ford is the creator of Only Skin and Shadow Hills. He graduated from the Center for Cartoon Studies in 2008. Now he lives in Brooklyn and designs books and walks his dog.

IN THE EMPORIUM

Sean’s comics can be found in the Secret Acres Emporium here.


IN PRAISE OF SEAN FORD

Sean Ford creates a world that’s both eerie and warmly mundane. Not an easy feat.

- Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home

This is the debut graphic novel from Sean Ford, published by the ever-exciting Secret Acres. It follows the lives of two orphans in what could easily be a post-apocalyptic world, but is actually modern rural America. The same desperation and unease that marks Cormac McCarthy’s The Road is also present here, with some unexpected and surreal interjections of the supernatural that make for an unpredictable and thoroughly engaging narrative. It’s all rendered in a style that recalls Dylan Horrocks and Craig Thompson, establishing Ford as a strong contender for the best new artist to emerge this year.

- Gavin Lees, Bleeding Cool

Sean Ford’s Only Skin is just the sort of comic book I like reading. Not only a tale of quirky surreal horror, intrigue, adventure and exquisite humor, this book has a great amount of heart.

- Farel Dalrymple, of Omega the Unknown and Pop Gun War

Sean Ford is a talent to watch.

- James Sturm

In a small Western town tucked between a mountain range and a pristine forest, citizens are disappearing. First it was the owner of the local gas station. Then two buddies who went out into the woods looking for him. When teenage Cassie and her brother, Clay, return to town in search of their estranged father, nothing seems right: The sheriff’s more worried about her land deal than the mystery, Cassie’s only co-worker is a narcoleptic, and there’s a ghost in Clay’s bedroom. As the town reckons with its future, Cassie grapples with her past and her father’s legacy.

Sean Ford’s Only Skin is a spooky graphic novel about small-town life and death. Ford’s deadpan pen-and-ink linework gives the book its sense of quiet menace; reading it, you have no idea what’s coming next, but you know it won’t be good news for these characters. Who is abducting townspeople? Why are deer turning up maimed? Why did Cassie and her brother leave, and what will happen to them now that they’ve come back?

- Dan Kois, Slate

Secret Acres doesn’t like to do anything easy, and Sean Ford’s Only Skin is a perfect fit for the publisher. The tale features two siblings attempting to deal with their father’s death and a series of mysterious attacks and disappearances in a small town surrounded by wilderness. The only thing about this narrative that’s black and white is the art. Everything else focuses on the oddness, liminality and flaws in jumping to conclusions. Rather than favoring vigilante action, Only Skin wants you to hold back and think before rushing off into danger, especially as there might not be an answer to your question. What’s more frightening: the unknown in the woods or the unknown in your neighbors? Ford doesn’t come down on one side or the other, but beautifully teases out the horror in his premise. The presence of a ghost who resembles the iconic sheet with eyes and a mouth is a particularly interesting choice, seemingly harmless and all the more frightening for it. The ending leaves one unsettled in a way that’s rare in any medium and calls to mind Werner Herzog’s gift for evoking the uncanny in a truly Freudian sense.

- Hillary Brown, Paste Magazine

A young woman and a boy get off a bus at a gas station and garage in the desert. It was their father’s business, he’s disappeared and presumed dead, and they’re taking it over, not all that long since their mother died, unreconciled with her formerly cheating husband, whose inamorata moved on to a younger man. Their dad isn’t the only one who goes missing in the course of this graphic novel resuscitation of the 1950s B-movie horror thriller that includes spooky elements (to wit, ghosts) but ultimately reaches a “natural,” if far-fetched, resolution. Exposing details of the action or the resolution would be churlish, for many may think them far less interesting than Ford actually makes them and skip this very well-executed graphic novel. Ford draws bigger kids and adults the way Charles Schulz might have, and his backdrops are as spare as the sets of those ’50s B-movies. The book’s in black-and-white (fortunately), and the big pages of this volume allow many a frame to have cinematic impact.

- Ray Olson, Booklist

It’s a well-crafted and spooky drama with all the best human and supernatural elements you could hope for in a gripping mystery story. The ghost character is at once hilarious and chilling and certainly my favorite from the book. The plot tosses and turns, evading understanding, only to finish with an even more terrifying conclusion than what can be imagined.

Only Skin is a very plot-driven book with its characters and environment serving purposeful roles to drive that plot forward. Its characters are interesting, not thin, despite this, but it’s easy to be sad at the end for lack of a few more substantial B-plots. You can see how Ford wrote in the potential to spiral this story into a long-running, fully-engaging series (it was originally serialized in 7 parts) but maybe he felt pressure over the long creation process to take few detours and concentrate on distilling and prioritizing his plan into a trim story with a good flow.

And it’s great, seriously. All things being equal, I just wish for more of it since the world is so interesting.

- Sarah Morean, IndieReader

This is the kind of comic book that will just give you the creeps. In a good way, of course. But the creeps, nonetheless.

Only Skin kicks off when Cassie and Clay return to their hometown to look into the mysterious disappearance of their father. He owned a gas station at the edge of what looks to be a pretty depressed town that’s getting more depressed by the minute. That’s because Cassie’s dad isn’t the only citizen who’s gone missing. One by one, more members of this small community are vanishing, and the police aren’t helping by telling the worried citizens that everything’s going to be okay as long as “no one goes into the woods!”

So, where does everyone end up going? The woods, of course.

Add to the creepiness of the disappearances a practical joke-loving ghost (the white bedsheet with two eyeholes kind) who follows Clay around and torments him, and a well meaning gas station attendant who inexplicably falls asleep in midsentence, and you’ve got all the ingredients for a five star “what the heck”-fest.

Ford has an amazing ability to capture the emptiness of the American small town and his tone is pitch perfect. If the Coen Brothers made comic books, this would be one of them.

- Josh Perilo, the Mindhut

The warnings from locals are immediate—the vast wooded area behind Cassie’s family’s gas station should go unexplored. “What? I’m not sure that’s a great idea,” says Chris, a mechanic who worked alongside Cassie’s father before he went missing. The forest in Sean Ford’s strange and beautiful book is an intimidating place that locks in most of Only Skin‘s murkiness. The book’s dreams and intangibility mystifies, too, in the townspeople’s odd nightmares or generally inexplicable experiences. For one, Chris’s sense of the present is hazy. He’s barely lucid at points, a narcoleptic, dozing off mid-conversation or napping in the garage at particularly unstable junctures of the story. The mild-mannered Paul dreams about his father’s brain disorder, a scenario that takes place in a hospital before Sean Ford plants the bed and IV bags in a grim forest setting, where Paul’s dad is drawn walking off into the trees. And Cassie’s brother Clay begins a regular dialogue with a ghost, the iconic Halloween-clipped-sheet-n’-eyeholes apparition you’ve always known but have never really been comfortable with. Their conversations begin when Clay appears to be asleep, and then suddenly outside, in the infinite Spoke State Forest.

Only Skin‘s oversized pages (8.25” x 11”) offer a roomy canvas for Ford’s sketch pens. Blacked-out night walks in town are barely illuminated by streetlamps and sunlit scenes have the spacious panels they call for. When Cassie gets back into the old neighborhood, she finds Chris talking to a cop and cleaning up a ghastly, bloody scene that transpired in the station’s lot. By the time she starts asking questions, a number of people have disappeared into the woods. From that point, even in its familiar framing and infrequent spots of dark humor, moments of certainty or comfort are scarce in Only Skin. “There’s a lot of territory out there…” says Chris. Sleepy or not, he means it.

- Dominic Umile, PopMatters

While the characters may be simply rendered, there is a clear drive on Ford’s part to suture us into a very real and unique locale through his lush backgrounds. With sweeping brushstrokes he carves out the expansive, mountainous landscape and seems to delight in full-page wordless spreads where the silence and desolate beauty of the town is practically palpable.

Indeed, if there’s one constant in the book, it’s that unsettling feeling of loneliness and separation that permeates every line and every word. In Only Skin, Ford holds a mirror to our own anxieties and presents a world where the most terrifying thing is neither ghosts nor murderers, but our own insecurity.

- Gavin Lees, Graphic Eye

Ford’s art in Only Skin is handsome; careful placed lines that shift from thin to thick, and provide a clean, uncluttered look to each person’s face and their surroundings. The two parts of the art for Only Skin that particularly stuck out for me, though, were the ghost and the landscape of the town and its surroundings. The ghost at a glance feels laughable, akin to the ghost outfits that the Peanuts characters wore in It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown! or the enemies in Pac-Man. It’s a disarming look, one that is slightly humorous and danger-deflating. As Only Skin progresses, though, the ghost becomes increasingly menacing while never changing its appearance. It’s an impressive feat on Ford’s part; something that looks so cute ends up being disturbing. The look of the small town is also in many ways just as important to Only Skin as its characters; Ford brings across that overall sense of isolation that is so critical to the story being told here. You truly get the sense that there’s nothing for miles, that the forest around the town is both a never-ending expanse as well as a dangerous barrier. By the time we get to see what lies beyond the forest thanks to Rachel’s story, we’ve gotten such a feel for the forest stretching on forever that its reveal is slightly surprising and also exuding an instant “this is a bad place” feel. It’s a nice trick, and helps make Only Skin as strong as it is.

I was pleasantly surprised and enthralled by Only Skin; I hadn’t read its mini-comic serialization up until now, which let me feel that much more surprised and startled by its series of events. Secret Acres has done a great job of finding and bringing into the spotlight various small press creators, and Ford and Only Skin are no exception. With an oversized presentation and a smooth cover stock, it’s a beautiful book to have on your shelf. Highly recommended.

- Greg McElhatton, Read About Comics

Only Skin: New Tales of the Slow Apocalypse gathers the previously serialized black-and-white comic epic by Sean Ford into a single graphic novel – with the addition of several dozen new pages, and an improved ending! A dark portrayal of rural America, seen from the perspective of orphaned siblings, Only Skin details the problems of people struggling to survive amid poverty and local corruption. Something is causing townspeople to disappear into the woods without a trace. But which is more evil – the lurking horror of ghosts, the hypocrisy of seemingly ordinary people who sell each other out for personal gain, or the murderous impulses of human hearts? Grim and suspenseful, Only Skin is as memorable as it is unsettling, and highly recommended for connoisseurs of quality independent graphic novels.

- Midwest Book Review

The book rests on the way various character arcs intertwine, with some characters acting as straight men and others as quirk magnets. There’s something killing people in a forest near a truck stop town, and a woman came back to try to find her missing father… In a comic where atmosphere meets absurdity, Ford cranked up both to a thrilling degree in this issue.

- Rob Clough, The Comics Journal

Only Skin is a wonderfully drawn book that show’s some great potential. He has 3 issues out and all have blown me away.

- Inkstuds

It is a town that could well be near Roswell, it could be a town that is linked in many ways to Twin Peaks. It could have the characters of Baghdad Café lurking in the shadows; it could become an X- Files case. It could be so many things but I have a feeling it will turn out to be something dangerous and new and very exciting.

- Comics Bulletin

Only Skin immediately grabbed my attention, and the humor and playfulness in Sean Ford’s narrative kept me engaged.

- Mark Siegel, First Second Books

While looking more like an Anders Nilsen by way of Pac-Man creation than anything the Brothers Hernandez ever created, the story of a small town and its disappearing residents is one that has a spiritual kinship (at least) to the trials and tribulations of the residents of Palomar–complete with a floating ghost where a little black monkey would be. As with any story that’s relatively (we imagine) a ways from being finished, most of what comes out of reading this is a desire to know more than one of really knowing what’s going on–what is happening to the disappeared, what the little ghost’s motive is, what’s hiding in the forest–you know, the tell-me-the-end-of-the-movie questions. Luckily, Ford has figured out to develop and draw characters enough so that they don’t all behave as interchangeable and indistinct men and women–it’s a small cast, but there’s plenty of cartoonists with no real ability to differentiate beyond anything other than gender. Ford doesn’t have that problem. Each and every voice here is distinct.

- The Factual Opinion

Sean deserves all the credit in the world for coming up with this idea and sticking with it. It’s way too easy to see things logically and financially and give up on comics when you’re halfway through a story; it happens all the time. But that’s not how genuine artistic achievements get done, and I think Sean is well on his way to pulling that off.

- Optical Sloth

BACKTALK

TWITTERPATED

RT @seanonlyskin: Shadows Hill 4 is printing now, debuting at @ripexpo next weekend! See, order, etc: http://t.co/1VZHWWV8IP http://t.co/eU…
- Tuesday Jul 29 - 2:00pm

RT @QuimbysBooks: Corinne Mucha reads from Get Over It tonight at 7pm! http://t.co/PUklUTe6qa
- Friday Jul 25 - 9:20pm

@seanonlyskin But DUDE, it's CREATOR OWNED Thor with a PENIS, BRO!
- Wednesday Jul 23 - 10:22pm

RT @CAKEchicago: Photo: Corinne Mucha will be celebrating her new book, Get Over It! (Secret Acres) at Quimby’s Bookstore... http://t.co/Mw…
- Wednesday Jul 23 - 9:26pm

@ryancecil PHEW. We're 2 old 2 code over here.
- Wednesday Jul 23 - 5:48pm

OFF THE WALL

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Secret Acres
Facebook IconJuly 18, 2014 at 1:16 pm

The thing about Mike Dawson's newest graphic novel, Angie Bongiolatti, is that it's daunting at first glance but kind of impossible not to identify with its characters. Well, you could somehow not identify with them, and that's your right, but you'd probably be completely insane. Rob Kirby, writing for the Comics Journal, writes about Angie Biongiolatti so well, that he might just be the ideal reader for this one. He's sensitive, empathetic, politically conscious and he likes to party. He also nails Angie, the character, who can come across as enigmatic or aloof, but it's her faith and her clarity, as Rob puts it (and we're paraphrasing), that make her the best barometer ever for the most difficult of times and the craziest of people. The key, though, is Rob writing that he knows these folks and he's partied with them. It would have been a lot easier for Mike if he'd had an agenda when he drew these people. Yeah, we might have recognized the ideas, but maybe we wouldn't have recognized these people. Poor Rob! He's one of THEM! Thanks, TCJ, and Rob, especially. This was a really good one.

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Angie Bongiolatti | The Comics Journal

http://www.tcj.com

A varied group of twenty-somethings sort out political beliefs and interpersonal relationships in post 9/11 New York City.

Secret Acres
Facebook IconJuly 17, 2014 at 4:28 pm

Well, folks, Edie Fake has arrived! This newest LA native gets a very warm welcome indeed from Joshua Michael Demaree at the LA Review of Books. It's both a full-blown interview, a complete history and in depth review of Memory Palaces, Edie's latest and our first ever art book. If you're worried about Edie going Hollywod, go ahead and worry since Demaree has christened him a "flourishing celebrity." At least, he's a flourishing celebrity in the queer art world. There's some stuff in here that rarely gets discussed, including Edie's background as a video artist and the influence of that medium on his comics work. We even get a mention in the story of how we met Edie, which almost didn't happen. Plus, and this was news to us as well, Edie's return to Chicago (after "going feral") coincided with the death of Michael Jackson. But was it a coincidence? Thank you, Joshua, for all your super thoughtful work here (and for making another dream come true and writing up a Secret Acres book for the LA Review of Books). Go and read this very funny and very serious career retrospective right now!

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http://lareviewofbooks.org/review/fake-places-work-edie-fake

lareviewofbooks.org

Joshua Michael Demaree on the career of Edie Fake.

Secret Acres
Facebook IconJuly 17, 2014 at 4:06 pm

We do realize it's all Corinne Mucha and all Get Over It! all over all the time these days, but we just had to share our joy over this latest rave from Joseph Erbentraut at the Huffington Post! Yes, that Huffington Post. Complete with an actual excerpt, Joseph gives a brief rundown of the rules regarding breakup recovery times, citing scientific studies and How I Met Your Mother, no less. We're not entirely sold on the sciences here, mostly because the science of love seems to make everyone feel bad for being insane. Let's face it, love is not just blind, but very stupid. As for HIMYM, we're playing catch up with that one, but their rule seems to fit pretty well. However, if you want the real, straight up survival guide to heartbreak, look no further than our Ms. Mucha. SHE KNOWS. Thanks, Joseph and HuffPo! Have a look at the link below.

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How Long It REALLY Takes To Get Over A Breakup

http://www.huffingtonpost.com

Once the romance fades and the relationship is over, how much time does it take to officially get over it? Science says a year and a half. One 2009 study suggested it takes nearly 18 months for divorcees to feel ready to move on after a split is f...

Secret Acres
Facebook IconJune 17, 2014 at 3:44 pm

Hooo boy... WELL. Corinne Mucha is not shy with the Philadelphia Inquirer, it seems. Tirdad Derakhshani, talking about Corinne's new book, Get Over It!, asks the ever important question when it comes to autobiocomics: did that REALLY happen? And, to quote Corinne, "I didn't add or make up anything." Really, one would hope that in the making of comics, the finest medium there is, about one's actual life, that the cartoonist behind them would be brutally honest. Get Over It! is surely that. Let's face it, heartbreak is ugly as love is beautiful. And who the hell would be able to identify with a clean breakup? Does that even happen? Our favorite part of this Inquirer inquiry is the origin story that sneaks its way in. No, Corinne wasn't super into Wolverine as a kid. She wanted to be a REAL artist. The comics all started by accident, it seems, in Rome. Like Rome, Italy. Also, speaking of the other half of the (not in) love story of Get Over It! you can get That Guy's reaction to the book here, too. In other words, you pretty much have to read this.

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Graphic novelist Corinne Mucha gets over her First Big Romance in 'Get Over It'

http://www.philly.com

'I mean, I want to get married someday," Corinne Mucha's boyfriend told her, a few months after persuading her to give up her life on the East Coast and follow him to Chicago. "Just not to you."

Secret Acres
Facebook IconJune 16, 2014 at 3:52 pm

ICYMI, as the kids say, here at last (after some more technical difficulties - and, yes, between this and our Friday night love-in at Bergen Street Comics being rained out, we are having technical difficulties galore) is Tom Spurgeon, aka the Comics Reporter, doing his Sunday Interview thing with Mike Dawson. As we can attest, these interviews are a lot of work, and require a ton of thought, so count yourself lucky that Mike is a thoughtful guy. There's plenty of shoptalk here, lots of stuff on process and the like. Angie Bongiolatti, Mike's latest graphic novel from us, was a long time in coming. There are plenty of ideas in this book, though, in a sense, it's about one thing and a certain time and place and age in post-9/11 New York. There was a lot of experimentation involved in finding a style that would both corral and express the ideas and move the narrative along, too. After all this, there was a lightning quick turnaround, with Mike finishing the book in January and us getting books printed by April. Angie Bongiolatti is catching up with its audience about now. Meanwhile, Mike has been all over the place, on tumblr, on Slate, on TCJ Talkies, and Tom has Mike talking about the future quite a bit, too. If you like Big Questions for cartoonists, this is a good place to be. As for Angie Bongiolatti, well, ask Mike says, " I think people just sort of have to read it." So go read it!

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The Comics Reporter

http://www.comicsreporter.com

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